What’s a Criscioletta?

‘La Sagra delle Crisciolette’ at Cascio which I attended a couple of evenings ago is a delight. We always seemed to miss it but this time with friends we finally made it!

Cascio is a charmer of a village with a great ambience and is famous for its unique criscioletta, a sort of pancake made with yellow (maize) and white flour, topped with a couple of slices of bacon and then cooked between two ferri (toasting irons) which have been greased with lard over a fire. The bacon melts its fat over the flour and thus binds the pancake firmly together.

I’ve described the town of Cascio and its history in some detail at https://longoio2.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/the-cascio-criscioletta/ . You’re welcome to read there how Cascio got its impressive town walls, turrets and gateway.

From being the food of the poor the criscioletta has been turned into a much-prized dish of the Garfagnana. The sagra has been going since 1969 and is now more flourishing than ever having been moved from the sports ground to the historic centre of the town, adding considerably to its atmosphere.

It’s best to arrive at Cascio by 7 pm so that one can admire the old town and enjoy the extensive views of the Serchio valley with the Apennines on one side and the Apuan range on the other. It’s also a good time because you can find a parking place with (relative) ease.

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One is then directed to the cash desk where one can order food and drink. We decided on a platter which included a criscioletta, ham, salami, cheese plus some beer.

Having found our table we then queued up with our food vouchers and collected the scrumptious vittles.

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Above us, on top of a terrace, the crisciolettari (crisciolette makers) were all in a line, busy making the pancakes topped with bacon slices which were then delivered to the general populace via a chute.

It was great fun, in addition to see the children play on the bouncy slide, and to generally people-watch.

The views from the ‘terrazza dell’Ada’, on the base of one of the four towers which mark the quadrilateral marked by Cascio’s 16th century walls were extensive and a warm sunset glow permeated the Garfagnana valley.

We took a digestive walk around the town after barely managing to devour the contents of our brimming platter. It was so filling!

There was a beautiful photographic exhibition inside the main gateway by La Spezia-born  Iris Gonelli, an engineer working at a nearby biopharmaceutical factory, who clearly loves travel and has a striking eye for taking spectacular photographs.

Most pretty were the flowery decorations set up by the local children at various points of the town.

At the top of the town was another row of crisciolettari busy at their crisciolettian task.

A folk-rock group was getting ready to play a selection of traditional melodies from the Lucca hills.

It must have been hot on that hot evening on the grills!

There’s also a disco further down in the remains of the Castellan’s mansion,

Some sagre provide less than spectacular food, other sagre are overcrowded with insufficient eating space. Cascio’s sagra is just right.  Excellent seating, spectacular views, lovely town, friendly people and most of all that irresistible criscioletta, truly worth travelling half the globe (or at least the Lucchesia) to savour it, whether with bacon, cheese or even with home-made Nutella!

The sagra continues from the 5th to 7th August and is open from 10 am until around midnight.

Don’t forget that Cascio also hosts a brilliant chestnut festival in autumn.

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